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Milford Graves



Clocktower's Jake Nussbaum sits down with master percussionist, homeopathic healer, gardener, martial arts expert, medical engineer, and all-around polymath Milford Graves, on the eve of his performance at the 20th annual Vision Festival, a weeklong celebration of free and avant-jazz taking place at Judson Church from July 5th-July 12th 2015. The two met at Mr. Graves's home in Jamaica, NY, which has been in his family for 3 generations.

The 2015 Vision Festival marks its twentieth anniversary with a celebration organized by Arts for Art (AFA) of the iconic New York artists who have set the standard for Free Jazz music, dance, visual art, poetry and ideas.

Milford Graves (b. 1941) is an American jazz drummer and percussionist, known as a pioneer of "free jazz" drumming, and for his research into the field of healing through music. He has worked with Pharaoh Sanders, Rashied Ali, Albert Ayler, Don Pullen, Kenny Clarke, Don Moye, Andrew Cyrille, Philly Joe Jones, Eddie Gómez, John Zorn, Paul Bley, and many many more. He taught at Bennington College from 1973-2011.
 

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