In Downtown Miami, our Focus On Puerto Rico residency program is in full swing. Learn more about our Residents and upcoming FOP program events. 

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In Downtown Miami, our Focus On Puerto Rico residency program is in full swing. 

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Music for Plants: Live in the Garden



Peter Coffin's 2006 compilation CD, Music for Plants, was made after his invitation to a diverse group of musical artists led to a variety of realizations of the title concept. His release party on Sunday, May 8, 2005 at the
6th Street and Avenue B Community Garden featured playback on a beatbox soundsystem, spiked punch and an assembled group of mellowed, introspective friends and passersby. The Clocktower's Jeannie Hopper wandered the grounds and collected assorted reflections.



The Music for Plants compilation features Mice Parade, Tetsu Inoue & seed( ), No Neck Blues Band, Languis, HiM, Syntony, Deaken and Geologist, Ariel Pink, Delia R. Gonzales & Gavin R. Russom, Sun Burn Hand of the Man, Ara Peterson, Hiroshi Sunairi & Hideyuki Mari, Fugu, Tony Goddess, Zs, Anthony Burdin, Wiese & Koh, This Invitation, Kenta Nagai, Liam Gillick, Kites, Jutta Koether, Alan Licht & Tom Verlaine, Black Dice, Arto Lindsay, DJ Olive the Audio Janitor, Phil Manley, David Grubbs, Electrophilia, Carter Thornton, LoVid, Flanged Confection, Christian Marclay, Tim Barnes, Chris Corsano, Sean Meehan, Barry Weisblat and Michael Evans, Rusty Santos, Roland Alley and Dearraindrop.
 

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