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In Downtown Miami, our Focus On Puerto Rico residency program is in full swing. 

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Kieran Hebden, Four Tet



Host Jeannie Hopper sits down with a true Renaissance musician, Kieran Hebden. This 33-year-old artist demands creative freedom, which results in work that has the space to evolve and change freely. He draws musical influences from almost everywhere.

Hebden tells Jeannie about the beginnings of his career with the British post-rock band Fridge in 1997. before going solo under the artist name Four Tet with Domino Records in 1998. As Four Tet, Hebden has put out seven records, working digitally and almost exclusively on his computer since 2003, making remixes and abstract electronic music.

Much changed in 2005 as Hebden was thinking more and more about the possibilities of live electronic improvisation. He was paired up with legendary drummer Steve Reid, who jammed with Miles Davis back in the day. Reid was engaged in experimental, "full on sonic assault" drumming, paired with spoken word. Magically, within the first three minutes of their sound check together, and Reid and Hebden commenced on what would be a five year collaboration until Reid's passing in 2010.

Hebden was in town for a show at New York's Webster Hall during CMJ, promoting his 2010 record There Is Love In You; he also landed at the Moog Festival in Ashville, NC. (41 minutes)
 

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Experimental Composers

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The object of this series is to invite emerging and established innovators to share their work. These programs are usually a combination of an interview with a far-reaching perspective on the artist's career, some recordings illustrating this history, and something new. Open territory. The unfortunate and unintended messages that come attached to a title like Experimental Composers are many. Still it is one of the few labels to come out of the world of music that has not been co-opted by promoters, corporations, journalists, or lawyers. This one just seems to have anti-market goo on it. Hooray. It's also just bad English (as if to imply that these poor souls are themselves, in their flesh and blood, some kind of experiment and, perhaps, even expendable). And then there is the spectre of defying the wisdom of the great Edgar Varèse who said something like, "I do not write experimental music. My experimenting is done before I make the music. Afterwards it is the listener who must experiment."
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