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In Downtown Miami, our Focus On Puerto Rico residency program is in full swing. 

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Elliott Sharp, Foliage



Composer Elliott Sharp joins David Weinstein in the studio to discuss the release of Foliage, a musical work realized through the tradition of the "graphic score." The two discuss process and listen to examples of Foliage being performed. They also discuss the history of the technique including historic efforts by composers such as Luigi Russolo and Cornelius Cardew. About this collection of pages designed to be both instructions/suggestions for sound and also a work of visual art, Sharp writes:

Foliage is a piece of retinal art as much as it is an instruction set for sound, form and function interlocked. Each individual page is complete in itself, some more simple, others not so. One may also look at the pages as sequences and sub-sequences – when quickly scrolled, they take on the form of animations. All have been created through multiple layers of processing. The result is a manifestation of that internal synaesthesia that is the translation of thought, emotion, and process from one set of frequencies to another.

The score, published as an eBook, is available through the publisher, Lulu, and through iTunes. Several large prints from the set are on view in the exhibition Render Visible, hosted by Present Company at 29 Wythe Ave, Brooklyn as part of a group show organized by Blonde Art Books in collaboration with Matthew Walker from September 30 – October 28, 2012.

 

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Experimental Composers

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The object of this series is to invite emerging and established innovators to share their work. These programs are usually a combination of an interview with a far-reaching perspective on the artist's career, some recordings illustrating this history, and something new. Open territory. The unfortunate and unintended messages that come attached to a title like Experimental Composers are many. Still it is one of the few labels to come out of the world of music that has not been co-opted by promoters, corporations, journalists, or lawyers. This one just seems to have anti-market goo on it. Hooray. It's also just bad English (as if to imply that these poor souls are themselves, in their flesh and blood, some kind of experiment and, perhaps, even expendable). And then there is the spectre of defying the wisdom of the great Edgar Varèse who said something like, "I do not write experimental music. My experimenting is done before I make the music. Afterwards it is the listener who must experiment."
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